Mountain Landscape Photography (Swiss Alps, Zermatt, Matterhorn)

Photographer, ski instructor and alpine hiker – does life get any better?

By Paul Hammett – subscribe to Paul’s YouTube channel

Swiss mountain photography is not just the Matterhorn!

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people visit Zermatt. The Matterhorn is always part of the draw, and it’s easy to see why.

So, for landscape photographers looking to capture the Swiss Alps, this is an iconic shot you need to get.

But I want to suggest there are many other amazing mountains all around Zermatt that deserve being captured by your lens.

My Favourite Swiss Alpine Mountains to Photograph

The Monte Rosa

At 4634m, the Monte Rosa is considerably higher than the Matterhorn and yet, still finds itself in the shade for attention.

The Monte Rosa is worth a look for its grand scale and surrounding glaciers. I find it tough to portray the size of the Monte Rosa in a photograph, but the best spots to view it from are the Gornergrat and Trockener Steg areas.

Since you’re here, make sure you capture the Monte Rosa for your mountain collection

The Ober Gabelhorn

You could spend a week shooting the Ober Gabelhorn. Its shape and structure appear to change as you view it from different angles and at different times of day, so it’s a new shot every time you look at it.

The Ober Gabelhorn looks especially good from the Sunnegga and Gornergrat areas and great from Schwarzsee and the Klein Matterhorn.

You can use the smaller peak and ridgeline of the Unter Gabelhorn to create foreground interest and a leading line up to the peak.

The shape-shifting Ober Gabelhorn is a formidable mountain with many peaks

The Breithorn

The Breithorn is the lowest of the peaks I’ve listed here at 4167m but a great mountain to photograph. The north face is a 1000 metre high wall of rock and ice that catches the evening light in June beautifully. For a more adventurous outing, take a guide and summit the peak.

You can shoot the Breithorn, or hike it with a guide, your choice

The Zinalrothorn

This is a mountain that catches the light best at dawn. It also makes a brilliant centre piece to a panorama that can include the peaks to either side of it.

You may have to wild camp to be in position to shoot the Zinalrothorn at dawn

Practice your panorama stitching technique before you come here – it pays!

The Long View in the Swiss Alps Will Reward You

You’ll be amazed how far you can look when you get up high into the Alps. From the Klein Matterhorn, you can point your camera in any direction for epic views.

Look north to the Bernese Alps, 40 miles away, to Mont Blanc in the west, 45 miles away and south to the Monte Viso, 100 miles away! Bring a long lens to take advantage of these spectacular views.

Mont Blanc showing off, 45 miles away

The Peak of Swiss Alps Photography, The Matterhorn

Wherever you are in the Zermatt area, the Matterhorn is always there. Whatever camera you have in your hand, it’s sure to be pointed at our famous peak at least once a day.

Given Zermatt has up to 30,000 visitors a day, I imagine this makes the Matterhorn the most photographed mountain in the world!

For the classic Matterhorn view, shoot from the Sunnegga / Rothorn area or around Zermatt village itself. It still looks good from the Gornergrat and Trockener Steg areas but you lose that famous pyramidal shape.

For that iconic reflection shot, the Stellisee is hard to beat. As I said in the video, when it comes to landscape photography, this is like shooting fish in a barrel.

Come to Zermatt and get your own iconic Matterhorn shot. Then turn your attention to the other alpine gems that are all around you.

You’ve seen many pictures of the Matterhorn, now make your own!

Paul Hammett

Paul is a ski instructor living in Zermatt, Switzerland. He has a passion for off-piste skiing and ski touring. In the summer months, he is also a keen runner, climber and mountaineer.

Although Paul’s early days “with a big camera” were focused on winter sports action photography, his love of the mountains made landscape photography an obvious progression. He enjoys the challenge of getting to the more remote places to find the perfect shot and likes the easier pace that landscape photography often affords.

In his spare time, he also makes mediocre YouTube videos (not true, they’re great to watch with amazing photographs – go see them and then subscribe).

Paul Hammett

Paul is a ski instructor living in Zermatt, Switzerland. He has a passion for off-piste skiing and ski touring. In the summer months, he is also a keen runner, climber and mountaineer.

Although Paul’s early days “with a big camera” were focused on winter sports action photography, his love of the mountains made landscape photography an obvious progression. He enjoys the challenge of getting to the more remote places to find the perfect shot and likes the easier pace that landscape photography often affords.

In his spare time, he also makes mediocre YouTube videos (not true, they’re great to watch with amazing photographs – go see them and then subscribe).

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